350K Gilbert Hall

"From Plague to Cholera: 

Disaster and Civic Responsibility"
Marie-Hélène Huet, the M. Taylor Pyne Professor of French joined the Princeton faculty in 1999 after teaching at the University of California, Berkeley (where she chaired the Department of French from 1982 to 1985), Amherst College, The University of Virginia and the University of Michigan . Professor Huet has written extensively on cultural history, historiography, 18th- and 19th- century literature, and the French Enlightenment. She is the author of  L’Histoire des voyages extraordinaires, Essai sur l’oeuvre de Jules Verne (Minard, 1973); Le Héros et son double (Corti, 1975); Rehearsing the Revolution: The Staging of Marat’s Death, 1793-1797 (University of California Press, 1982);  Monstrous Imagination (Harvard University Press, 1993), which was awarded the Harry Levin Prize in Comparative Literature, and Mourning Glory: The Will of the French Revolution (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1997). Her articles have appeared in French and American journals including Litterature, the Revue des Sciences Humaines, Critical InquiryRepresentationsDiacritics, and the Yale French Review. Professor Huet’s current interests lie in the cultural, political and philosophical legacy of the Enlightenment. She has been the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (1987) and a Rockefeller Residential Fellowship at Bellagio (1989). She was a fellow at the Center for Advanced Studies at the University of Virginia in 1993. 

Sponsored by the Willson Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Department of Romance Languages

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